The Art of Fugue is both Johann Sebastian Bach's opus summum and last complete work, presumably undertaken between1740 and 1742. Die Kunst der Fuga (KdF hereafter), in the form and the order presented in the Berlin Autograph, has all the appearance of a finished work featuring 14 fugues and canons, all based upon a single original theme, serving as the work's foundation and with the individual pieces progressing in an increasing order of difficulty and contrapuntal perfection. This brief study sets out to attempt a switch in perspective, shifting from the 'point of view' of the First Printed Edition - through which the KdF has traditionally been examined by the vast majority of scholars - to that of the Berlin Autograph. Despite having already been studied and collated with the 1751 and 1752 editions, the autograph has always been viewed by the dominant ideology as incomplete; little more than a preparatory stage for it's printed counterparts. Only in recent times have scholars started to note that the KdF as found in the autograph manuscript at the time of it's completion might well stand comparison with the alleged 'final version' of the printed editions, and thus may be elevated to the full dignity of an Alte Fassung. And this study would argue that the Berlin Autograph contains, in fact, the latest and 'closest-to-final' version of the KdF, whilst the First Printed Edition is entirely the result of the conjoint efforts of Bach's children and students as there is no proof that Bach was ever involved in preparatory works concerning any other of it's pieces. Furthermore, the order displayed in the Berlin Autograph appears decidedly more logical and "artistic" than that of the First Printed Edition.
The Art of Fugue is both Johann Sebastian Bach's opus summum and last complete work, presumably undertaken between1740 and 1742. Die Kunst der Fuga (KdF hereafter), in the form and the order presented in the Berlin Autograph, has all the appearance of a finished work featuring 14 fugues and canons, all based upon a single original theme, serving as the work's foundation and with the individual pieces progressing in an increasing order of difficulty and contrapuntal perfection. This brief study sets out to attempt a switch in perspective, shifting from the 'point of view' of the First Printed Edition - through which the KdF has traditionally been examined by the vast majority of scholars - to that of the Berlin Autograph. Despite having already been studied and collated with the 1751 and 1752 editions, the autograph has always been viewed by the dominant ideology as incomplete; little more than a preparatory stage for it's printed counterparts. Only in recent times have scholars started to note that the KdF as found in the autograph manuscript at the time of it's completion might well stand comparison with the alleged 'final version' of the printed editions, and thus may be elevated to the full dignity of an Alte Fassung. And this study would argue that the Berlin Autograph contains, in fact, the latest and 'closest-to-final' version of the KdF, whilst the First Printed Edition is entirely the result of the conjoint efforts of Bach's children and students as there is no proof that Bach was ever involved in preparatory works concerning any other of it's pieces. Furthermore, the order displayed in the Berlin Autograph appears decidedly more logical and "artistic" than that of the First Printed Edition.
608917284225
Die Kunst Der Fuga 1080
Artist: Alberto Rasi
Format: CD
New: Not in stock
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Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: I. Fuga Simplex Rectus, Bwv 1080/1
2. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: II. Fuga Simplex Inversus, Bwv 1080/3
3. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: III. Fuga Plagalis, Bwv 1080/2
4. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: IV. Counter-Fugue - Fuga Inversa, Bwv 1080/5
5. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: V. Fuga Rectus With Obbligato Countersubjects Alla Duodecima, Bwv 1080/9
6. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: VI. Fuga Inversus With Two Obbligato Countersubjects Alla Decima, Bwv 1080/10
7. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: VII. Fuga Inversa In Stylo Francese, Bwv 1080/6a
8. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: VIII. Fuga Inversa Per Augment. Et Diminut. Bwv 1080/7
9. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: IX. Canon In Hypodiapason (Canon Alla Ottava), Bwv 1080/15
10. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: X. Fuga A Tre Soggetti A 3, Bwv 1080/8
11. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: XI. Fuga A Quattro Soggetti A 4, Bwv 1080/11
12. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: XII. Canon Per Augmentationem In Contrario Motu, Bwv 1080/14
13. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: Xiiia. Mirror Fugue In Contrappunto Simplici A 4 Rectus, Bwv 1080/12,1
14. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: Xiiib. Mirror Fugue In Contrappunto Simplici A 4 Inversus, Bwv 1080/12,2
15. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: Xiva. Mirror Fuga Inversa In Contrappunto Duplici A 3 Rectus, Bwv 1080/18,2
16. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: Xivb. Mirror Fuga Inversa In Contrappunto Duplici A 3 Inversus, Bwv 1080/18,1
17. Die Kunst Der Fuga, Bwv 1080: Fuga A 3 Soggetti [Unfinished]

More Info:

The Art of Fugue is both Johann Sebastian Bach's opus summum and last complete work, presumably undertaken between1740 and 1742. Die Kunst der Fuga (KdF hereafter), in the form and the order presented in the Berlin Autograph, has all the appearance of a finished work featuring 14 fugues and canons, all based upon a single original theme, serving as the work's foundation and with the individual pieces progressing in an increasing order of difficulty and contrapuntal perfection. This brief study sets out to attempt a switch in perspective, shifting from the 'point of view' of the First Printed Edition - through which the KdF has traditionally been examined by the vast majority of scholars - to that of the Berlin Autograph. Despite having already been studied and collated with the 1751 and 1752 editions, the autograph has always been viewed by the dominant ideology as incomplete; little more than a preparatory stage for it's printed counterparts. Only in recent times have scholars started to note that the KdF as found in the autograph manuscript at the time of it's completion might well stand comparison with the alleged 'final version' of the printed editions, and thus may be elevated to the full dignity of an Alte Fassung. And this study would argue that the Berlin Autograph contains, in fact, the latest and 'closest-to-final' version of the KdF, whilst the First Printed Edition is entirely the result of the conjoint efforts of Bach's children and students as there is no proof that Bach was ever involved in preparatory works concerning any other of it's pieces. Furthermore, the order displayed in the Berlin Autograph appears decidedly more logical and "artistic" than that of the First Printed Edition.